justmyflawedlogic:

Right, the Angel RPG just got here. I’m loving it and I was totally psyched to run it but I realised something after running a filler Risus game for my group and reflecting a little on our Savage Worlds steampunk game…
Our group is crazy awesome. Emphasis on crazy.
There was a lot of grinning when it came down to human-sized animals taking on a the deathstar created by evil space bears,they seemed to enjoy the insane flying clockwork circus and we got more than a laugh or two within the clock covered space distorting laboratory.
Angel, and even most Buffy, takes itself a little seriously for the group and so… while I was slipping the angel Corebook back onto my RPG shelf I had a quick (open minded) glance over my games.Then it struck me.
Gamma World.
Easy to learn system. Character creation is a snap. Most of the group have played D&D already. Nice structure for the session setup. Expansions aplenty.Simple combat for those who aren’t fans but agile and different to keep our fighters interested, but the important part is the setting. Every possible universe combined at once. Sentient swarms of kittens as player characters. Evil monopolising badgers.
I believe we’ve found a winner.

justmyflawedlogic:

Right, the Angel RPG just got here. I’m loving it and I was totally psyched to run it but I realised something after running a filler Risus game for my group and reflecting a little on our Savage Worlds steampunk game…

Our group is crazy awesome.
Emphasis on crazy.

There was a lot of grinning when it came down to human-sized animals taking on a the deathstar created by evil space bears,
they seemed to enjoy the insane flying clockwork circus
and we got more than a laugh or two within the clock covered space distorting laboratory.

Angel, and even most Buffy, takes itself a little seriously for the group and so… while I was slipping the angel Corebook back onto my RPG shelf I had a quick (open minded) glance over my games.
Then it struck me.

Gamma World.

Easy to learn system. Character creation is a snap. Most of the group have played D&D already. Nice structure for the session setup. Expansions aplenty.Simple combat for those who aren’t fans but agile and different to keep our fighters interested, but the important part is the setting.
Every possible universe combined at once. Sentient swarms of kittens as player characters. Evil monopolising badgers.

I believe we’ve found a winner.

hitpts:

Love this sh!t

hitpts:

Love this sh!t

cryptofwrestling:

Gamma World ad(1979)

cryptofwrestling:

Gamma World ad
(1979)

therealdanacardinal:

I hope this hasn’t been done

(via terribleaffection)

classictrek:

When Roddenberry first proposed Star Trek to the network, he sent over a sixteen-page memo entitled “Star Trek Is…” that explained what the core concept for the series was while offering up story possibilities. It’s obvious how talented Roddenberry was as a salesman: he makes the now-famous parallel to Wagon Train and outlines how he can make a smart show that manages to be budget-conscious at the same time with the “Parallel Worlds” concept. We’d see the latter appear in the series as Hodgkin’s Law of Parallel Planetary Development, which gave them the opportunity to use existing sets and costumes.

It’s interesting to look at now and see how various ideas mutated and combined to become episodes of The Original Series and The Next Generation that we now know and love. “The Next Cage,” obviously, becomes “The Cage” and “The Day Charlie Became God” would later air as “Charlie X.” In David Gerrold’s The World Of Star Trek, he writes that there was a sincere attempt to make “Kongo” into a full-fledged episode with a script having seen multiple drafts but that, perhaps thankfully, never happened. DeForest Kelley was very keen on that idea, as he wanted an episode that would center around his character’s working relationship (and friendship) with Uhura.

(The Drake equation, for the record, is real. Roddenberry didn’t have a copy of the original equation at the time of the presentation, so he made up his own version to use. When he visited the set, Dr. Frank Drake pointed out that a value raised to the first power is just the value itself.)

(via fuckyeahstartrek)

fallout-enthusiast:

Shit the Courier says

(via falloutenergy596)

tmclark91:

Generally I don’t nerd out actively as much here regarding updates to favorite tabletop games, but next week has me pretty stoked.  Paizo is releasing the Advanced Class Guide for their Pathfinder Roleplaying Game tabletop, and it’s got me pretty excited for a number of reasons—

1) New classes— Yep.  Ten new classes, each utilizing a set of skills inspired by the previous core classes, now available to play and expand on character creation of the popular tabletop RPG.  From the charismatic swashbuckler to the zealous warpriest, it’s ten classes (each with their own set of archetype builds) of all new fun with friends.

2) New iconics— One of the things I loved about Pathfinder is how each player class in their game is an iconic character existing in the universe’s continuity.  Each character is fleshed out with their own back story and why they took up the adventurer’s call.  The Advanced Class Guide adds ten new faces into the Pathfinder universe, each ready to carve their own path of destiny.

3) This one is just a personal quirk of mine, but I like the even male:female ratio of the genders of this new batch of iconics coming to the Pathfinder universe.  Especially towards the ladies, who have some well-written back stories that will assuredly put them on the path of strong female characters.  Visually they look spectacular too— none of them seem to hit the stereotypical “fantasy female sexy wardrobe” one would expect.  These ladies come pretty much clad head to toe in full armor, ready for a fight.  It’s beautiful.  c:

The Advanced Class Guide hits shelves next week… so glad I put in my pre-order.  I’m stoked~

notesfromtheoverlord:

Pathfinder with googly eyes.

notesfromtheoverlord:

Pathfinder with googly eyes.

wolfaux:

Gnoll Illustration by Tim Kings-Lynne

wolfaux:

Gnoll Illustration by Tim Kings-Lynne